Local Government GIS Coordinator Forum Summary

 

IndianaMap Q&A Summary

Below is a brief summary of the IndianaMap Q&A session, or you can download the pdf version.

Question 1: Are IGIC and the Geographic Information Officer (GIO) meeting the needs of all levels of government, including counties, cities, and towns?

Question 2: Do you (Cities, Towns and Counties) use the current IndianaMap  the portal, UITS, data downloads, etc.? How do you use it? How often do you use it? What do you use the most often?

Question 3: How will you (Cities, Towns and Counties) use the four statewide data layers (parcels, road centerlines, address points, and boundaries)?

Question 4: How do you envision the Broadband Mapping Project impacting you  either positively or negatively?

Question 5: What is the future of the IndianaMap?

 


 

Question 1: Are IGIC and the Geographic Information Officer (GIO) meeting the needs of all levels of government, including counties, cities, and towns?

Q: Are IndianaMap grants and funding options only available to counties?
A: The recent WEBGIS grant from the Indiana Department of Homeland Security specified $15,000 for each county, as it was the best way to leverage this money. Stimulus dollars, however, are not tied to counties.

Q: Could IGIC do a better job with educating legislators about GIS technologies?
A: The Legislative Committee is preparing a package for this purpose.
A: Users are encouraged to share GIS success stories with other GIS professionals.
A: IGIC is also looking into preparing Volume Two of the Return on Investment Study.

Q: What can Cities and Counties do to support IGIC?
A: By using the GIS Inventory (Ramona) and updating your data and point of contact information. You can send links and information on web-based and static map products you provide (e.g. .pdf, .jpg, etc) to info@igic.org.
A: Know your IGIC representative. They represent their entire sector (counties, municipalities, etc.) and can share your concerns with the full IGIC Board. You can find all the Board members and their contact information at www.igic.org/activities/board.html.

Q: Does IGIC participate in the AIC (Association of Indiana Counties) and IACT (Indiana Association of Cities and Towns) conferences, and are the GIS awards IGIC gives out to locals showcased at conferences like these?
A: Yes and No. IGIC participated last year, and will do so again this year at both the AIC and IACT conferences. IGIC has not showcased or presented specific local projects at these conferences, but that is an excellent suggestion.

 


 

Question 2: Do you (Cities, Towns and Counties) use the current IndianaMap  the portal, UITS, data downloads, etc.? How do you use it? How often do you use it? What do you use the most often?

A: A majority of attendees indicated they use it at least once a month for a number of tasks, including: Base map data; bookmarks to create HTML links to a specific view; electric utility service areas; as part of class activities in schools; 911 reference tool to view neighboring county centerlines and imagery; address and parcel data; and public enquiries.

 


 

Question 3: How will you (Cities, Towns and Counties) use the four statewide data layers (parcels, road centerlines, address points, and boundaries)?

A: Facilitate inter-government communication. Jurisdictions need information from outside their own boundaries. It can be a one-stop-shop for data needed for multi-jurisdictional incidents or issues. Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO) boundaries do not stop at county borders, and neither to natural disasters.

A: Provide faster access to parcel information. Surveyors can use the data to quickly find parcel information to assist with answering property question. They can also find legal drain taxation outside of the county.

A: Improve perception of local data. It bolsters the idea of local data as the source. It is a validation of the integrity of local data State and Federal agencies sometimes refuse to use local data, and this can be frustrating, but there is a growing recognition of the value of this data as it becomes more accessible.

A: Base Reference. It can be used as a standard base reference, with new data being overlaid on it, as the best available parcel and centerline data.

A: Census efforts, map modernization.

A: Resource during disaster events. It is very important for emergency management and disaster events. For example, FEMA needs local data during floods. They can immediately use the local data from the IndianaMap as their initial data source, and only go to locals when additional information is needed.

A: Economic development. It is a way to communicate about shovel ready projects and capital projects.

 


 

Question 4: How do you envision the Broadband Mapping Project impacting you  either positively or negatively?

A: A county may have a local communication board, but no resources to compile the data, especially since broadband can be very political even though it’s very straight-forward technology. Telecom groups need statewide support to aid new projects. Data needs include tower locations, power radius, wire centers, service areas, elevation and signal strength. The project can provide a tool to better understand how to expand broadband infrastructure, availability, use existing service and make better decisions related to broadband. It can also help local providers with economic development. The military sees broadband as an important communication and transportation channel. The Broadband Service Mapping Project would be a good topic for a 2010 IGIC seminar.

 


 

Question 5: What is the future of the IndianaMap?

Q: What additional data sources are planned?
A: Historic data will be added once the framework data is completed and maintained. There is some historical imagery available at this time. Priorities will change as requirements change.

Q: How about future plans for the technology?
A: WFS and WMS capability will be added for the existing shape files. Mashup capabilities with Flex, Silverlight/WPF applications are easy to use.

Q: Will the GIO (Geographic Information Officer) help Cities, Towns and Counties stand up Web Feature Services?
A: IOT (Indiana Office of Technology), which houses the GIO, is thinking of this, but has to consider not competing with the private sector.

Q: What are plans for the new Statewide Orthophotography Program?
A: Current funding allows for statewide 50 cm (18-inch) or 60 cm (2-foot) pixel resolution.

Q: Would this meet your needs (Cities, Towns and Counties)?
A: No.

Q: Would you be willing to buy-up to 30 cm (1-foot) or 15 cm (6-inch) resolution?
A: Yes, as long as the cost was cheaper than what could be done independently.
[Estimated cost reduction would be about 60%.]

Q: Would you (Cities, Towns and Counties) require the data in SPE/SPW US Survey Feet or would UTM-16 Meters work?
A: State Plane East/West in US Survey Feet. SPE/SPW US Survey Feet is required for County and City Surveyors. Making a switch would be a huge problem. Some software packages do not reproject.

Q: How important is LiDAR to you (Cities, Towns and Counties)? How are you using it or how would you use it?
A: Primarily used for topography and flood plain determination. A show of hands indicated a majority interested in LiDAR.