Breakout Sessions

Local Government GIS Coordinator Forum

 

Breakout Session Q&A Summary

You can download a complete summary of the day’s discussion in pdf version.

Cities and Towns Breakout Session

Question 1: What are some tips for a successful GIS implementation?
Question 2: How is IGIC not meeting the needs of municipal government?
Question 3: What are some suggestions for IGIC?

 

County Breakout Session

Question 1: Has your county come up with any novel ways of funding GIS?
Question 2: Have you had problems getting departments to use available data? How have you addressed this?
Question 3: Do you sell your data?
Question 4: Do you work closely with your highway maintenance department?

 


 

Cities and Towns Breakout Session

Question 1: What are some tips for a successful GIS implementation?

A: Find a simple win and build on that success.
A: Create your maps, get them out and show off what you can do. Let the technology sell itself
A: Have a project champion  the higher up the ladder the better.
A: Sometimes you have to use tough love meaning that, once you train someone how to do something using the GIS, make them do it themselves next time and stop doing it for them. It’s the only way they will learn and the only way you’ll be able to delegate that responsibility.
A: Hamilton County, Fishers, Noblesville and Westfield contribute much of their success to HAGTAG, a technical advisory group to facilitate jurisdictional coordination, cooperative agreements and technical information sharing.

Question 2: How is IGIC not meeting the needs of municipal government?

A: They are still too Indy-centric with their meetings and seminars. Would it possible to do more in other parts of the state?

[IGIC is aware of this concern and is doing more to address it, such as the Road Shows, webinars, newly introduced regional dinner meetings, and the promotion of regional users groups. Becky McKinley encouraged people to start up a user group in their area and both Bill Holder and she volunteered to help anyone who was interested in doing this.]

Question 3: What are some suggestions for IGIC?

A: Have more of a presence at the Indiana Association of City and Towns annual conference. This is where elected officials and policy makers can be educated on GIS.

[Phil Worrall indicated that IGIC met with the County Surveyor’s last year, but has not been on the general program to present to all attendees. IGIC will do a better job of this in the future.]

A: Consider moving the annual Indiana GIS Conference around the state to give others more of an opportunity to attend.

[Laura Haley indicated that in 2009 and 2010 the Conference was in Bloomington, and for 2011 the Conference Committee is looking at Muncie. Lafayette is also under consideration.]

 


 

County Breakout Session

Question 1: Has your county come up with any novel ways of funding GIS?

A: Hiring vendors to market data for GIS department. GIS department gets a percentage of the sale.
A: Fee from each property transaction or document recording.
A: Sharing the cost of orthophotography flights with Cities and Towns.
A: Several Counties sell data but have signed on with the Data Sharing Initiative, believing the State will obtain the data regardless.

Question 2: Have you had problems getting departments to use available data? How have you addressed this?

A: Developed in-house training programs and action plans.
A: Used a different software platform than usual to get them started (i.e. Pictometry or web-based tools).
A: Provided basic users with basic tools, not the entire suite, so they wouldn’t be overwhelmed with GIS geek. After they learn the basic tools, they ask for more.

Question 3: Do you sell your data?

A: Allen County does sell data. Their data is copyrighted and they charge for the section, township or countywide dataset up to $15,000. Delaware, Johnson, and Hancock Counties and IMAGIS have similar arrangements.
A: Hamilton County no longer sells any data.
A: Some Counties charge for the time it takes to fill a request.
A: The discussion raised the question: Is there a relationship between free downloadable data and economic growth?

Question 4: Do you work closely with your highway maintenance department?

A: Lake County sets up a layers template for them, but does not edit their data.
A: Allen County GPS’s all the streets and addresses, and provides data checks and hosting services. The highway department adds pavement management information.
A: Hancock County created applications for their mobile units and ArcView applications.
A: Johnson County provides county centerline data and works with the highway department to calculate road and highway mileage.
A: Marion County edits street information on a weekly basis.
A: The Noble County Highway Department needs information for line striping, so GIS provided centerline mileage.
A: Madison County uses geo-reference cameras.